Tamara Hastie - Creative Mixed Media and Portrait Photographer, Flagstaff, Arizona
creative mixed media & portrait photographer
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A simple blog containing photography, videos, and creative media by Tamara Hastie.

A simple blog containing photography, videos, and creative media by Tamara Hastie of rock climbing, portraits, HD video, and other various forms of mixed media.

What camera gear do you travel with?

As a rock climber and one who travels in the backcountry on four wheels and on two feet, frequently requires us to slim down on what we "really" need on the trip. Weight is always a concern for me, and not to mention packability- these items must fit into my ArcTeryx backpack. Also my individual camera/ audio/ batteries and rechargers gear must fit into specific bags along with my climbing gear, camping supplies, food and water. The weight and bulkiness is a huge concern.  I want to push on hiking, climbing or jumaring, not to be concerned about too much weight on my hips, knees and feet. Jeeps are not large, so packing down even for overland travel when heading out to the dirt roads is something you should be concerned with.

If you happen to be traveling by plane please do not check in your camera equipment.

Carry-on only.

Why?

I have heard many horror stories about expedition filming and the one person who checks in their bags, are the ones who have their camera gear lost in transit. I have learned from their mistakes, hopefully you will too.

Your filming mission will be over quick if your gear is lost.

You are not going to be able to recover your gear, buy replacements, or have them shipped and sent in time (or maybe you have time?), but my recommendation is keep your equipment close to you at all times.

If this is impossible, then maybe reconsider how much you are taking and why?

I am all about simple. Simplicity over complex productions are less cluttered, so force yourself to pack down.

Here I am with my FM10....

Here is a list that I go by:

One DSLR and SLR 35mm. (I am a film junkie and the FM10 is light)

Bringing three to four lenses for your DLSR- no more.

MoVi, it wights almost five pounds but well worth it for steady shots.

Manfrotto Monopod- duh, of course.... but if your are in the backcountry and on foot or hanging off ropes and chilling on cliffs get the Induro High-Hat, small profile and weighs two pounds less!

Rode Video Mic Pro- small, low profile

Sennheiser G3 Wireless kit- easy.

H1 Zoom- small and light.

Tiffen Graduated ND Filters/ polarizers

MacBook Air

35mm film, batteries and a Goal Zero battery charger.

Use natural light or clothing to bounce light

Camera bag, and Movi bag, audio bag.

If you are dealing with any sort of weather predicament, sand, water, or any plain dirty situations consider dry bags for all electronics, this will save you, your equipment and mental anguish of "what if" my stuff gets ruined by this or that. Just do it.

River trips are notorious for sand, water and wind. Protect you gear.

Is that all you need to put in you backpack or travel bag? Yep. Simple.

Now you have room for a few more chocolate bars for the trip, and when you get to your filming location, you will have to think and filter through less gear and be much more precise and focused on what you have to use and telling your story, than what you could use and really don't need.

Don't clutter your brain with 'what ifs'."

Cliff-side and to be A-okay, pack down your weight.

Create your travel itinerary and write down what shots and gear you will need for each day of travel, this will keep the items you need on top of your pack when you pack up belongings in the morning. Keep organized. Just because you are traveling does not mean that you are skipping out on what you do best, storytelling, so keep in mind what, when, and where your shooting and make your own filmmaking magic.

The  process of filmmaking does not start when you plane hits the tarmac, or jeep when it hits the dirt, or when you feet hit the trailhead, it starts at home with planning,  preparation and packing.

 

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